Violence

17. Online Violence

We call on all internet stakeholders, including internet users, policy makers and the private sector, to address the issue of online harassment and technology-related violence. The attacks, threats, intimidation and policing experienced by women and queers are real, harmful and alarming, and are part of the broader issue of gender-based violence. It is our collective responsibility to address and end this.


Background

Technology-related violence against women - such as cyberstalking, harassment and misogynist speech - encompasses acts of gender-based violence that are committed, abetted or aggravated, in part or fully, by the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), such as phones, the internet, social media platforms, and email. Technology-related violence against women is part of the same continuum as violence against women offline.

Visit http://www.genderit.org/onlinevaw/ for APC's full research on ending technology-related violence against women.

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Related Resources

Chido Musodza is one of nine digital security trainers currently with Digital Society of Zimbabwe (DSZ). Her specialty is in the translation of open source applications from English to Shona, one of Zimbabwe’s local languages. Chido is also a Programme Officer with Radio Voice of the People, a national radio station that broadcasts via satellite; and podcasts, and distributes information via website and social media. She was one of the feminists who were part of the Harare City Conversation held by Association of Progressive Communications in Harare earlier this year.

Social media is ushering in a new era of mobilizing for social change: it is a promosing tool for spreading feminist discourse. Examples abound. A global wave of awareness and action on violence against women (VAW) is emerging from campaigns such as #EverydaySexism, #UrgentAction4Women and #EndFMG (female genital mutilation), opening new opportunities for feminis movement building.